Lack of time is one of the most commonly cited barriers to physical activity. The good news is, research shows it is possible for a person to improve their health by incorporating even a small amount of exercise into their daily routine. Health professionals can share these three key facts about physical activity with patients to help encourage them to meet the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines.
A new report out from the Safe Routes to School National Partnership and the Y, Making Strides: 2018 State Report Cards on Support for Walking, Bicycling, and Active Kids and Communities, analyzes state policy in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia to provide a snapshot of each state’s support for walking, biking, and physical activity. The report cards look at 27 indicators of support across four key areas: Complete Streets and Active Transportation, Safe Routes to School and Active Transportation Funding, Active Neighborhoods and Schools, and State Physical Activity Planning and Support. All of the indicators studied in the report cards have a great impact on a person’s ability to be physically active depending on where they live.
Physical literacy has been defined as the ability to move with competence and confidence in a wide variety of physical activities in multiple environments that benefit the healthy development of the whole person. Fran Cleland, Past President of SHAPE America, explains why physical literacy is important, the role of SHAPE America's 5 National Standards, and how Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs can impact the physical activity behaviors of young Americans.
The President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition (PCSFN) recently relaunched the I Can Do It! (ICDI) model to address the needs of more than 56 million children and adults with a disability. ICDI is a customizable, eight-week model that leverages Mentor-Mentee relationships to inspire individuals with a disability to lead a lifestyle that includes regular physical activity and healthy eating behaviors. Health promotion programs using the ICDI model serve Mentees of all abilities, engaging participants in a range of sport, recreation, fitness, and healthy eating activities.
In recognition of National Youth Sports Week, Aspen Institute's Project Play Initiative shares 8 plays – strategies – that health professionals, parents, and organizations can utilize to help kids get active through sports. Moving sports and physical activity participation numbers at a population level is never easy, even with the engagement of organizations with great influence. Health professionals can shape strategies and create policies that align with the interests of children, as reflected in the framework of Project Play.
Everybody needs physical activity for good health and inclusive after-school programs can help increase physical activity among children of all abilities. Girls on the Run, in collaboration with the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), recently completed a pilot inclusion program aimed at involving girls with disabilities across the country in this physical activity-based positive youth development program.
America Walks has worked tirelessly to make sure all community members have safe, accessible, and enjoyable places to walk and be physically active. To recognize the community change agents working in this space across the United States, America Walks launched its Community Change Grant program in 2015. This program provides funds to catalyze smaller-scale, low-cost projects and programs that increase the prevalence of walking, expand the diversity of people and organizations working to advance walkability, and help to make walking safer, easier, and more fun for all community members. Read about how one group is taking strides to "Walk Across Alabama."