High blood pressure raises your risk for serious health problems — but many people don’t know they have it. Check your blood pressure regularly to find problems early and protect your health. Learn about checking your blood pressure.

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News & Events

ODPHP plays a crucial role in keeping the nation healthy. Stay up to date on our work by checking out our blog posts, news and announcements, and upcoming events.

April National Health Observances: Minority Health, Alcohol Awareness, and More

National Health Observances

Each month we highlight National Health Observances (NHOs) that align with our mission to improve health in the United States. In April, we’re raising awareness about minority health, alcohol awareness, and celebrating public health. We’ve gathered some resources below that you can use to join the conversation and spread the word about these NHOs with your networks! National Minority Health Month The U...

Update: CE’s Now Available for The Importance of Preventive Services and Lessons Learned from the Pandemic Webinar on March 21

Healthy People 2030

The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion is pleased to announce that continuing education credits (CEs) will be offered* for the next webinar in the Healthy People 2030 Webinar Series: The Importance of Preventive Services and Lessons Learned from the Pandemic. This webinar will take place on Tuesday, March 21 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm ET...

March National Health Observances: Nutrition, Colorectal Cancer, and HIV/AIDS

National Health Observances

Each month we feature select National Health Observances (NHOs) that align with our priorities for improving health across the nation. In March, we are raising awareness about nutrition, colorectal cancer, and HIV/AIDS.

Heart Health

ODPHP Director's Blog Graphic

Heart disease has the potential to affect all people. The persistent myth that it is primarily a “men’s disease” simply isn’t true. In fact, heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. Yet only about half of women recognize this. Heart disease accounts for about 1 in 5 deaths among women every year as compared to 1 in 4 deaths in men. About 1 in 16 women age 20 years and older have coronary artery disease, the most common type of heart disease.