About the National Data

Data

Baseline: 0.46 deaths with hepatitis B as the underlying or contributing cause of death per 100,000 population were reported in 2017

Target: 0.16 per 100,000

Numerator
Number of deaths with hepatitis B (ICD-10 codes: B16, B17.0, B18.0, and B18.1 listed as an underlying or a contributing cause of death).
Denominator
Number of persons.
Target-setting method

Maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies, or laws

Target-setting method details
N/A
Target-setting method justification
The target was selected to align with the 2030 target presented in the Viral Hepatitis National Strategic Plan (VH-NSP) for the indicator "Reduce rate of hepatitis B–related deaths by 20% by 2025 and 65% by 2030." The Indicators subcommittee of the VH-NSP, in consultation with HHS leadership, set quantitative targets to eliminate viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030, in alignment with WHO Global Health Sector Strategy on Viral Hepatitis 2016-2021 and the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine A National Strategy for the Elimination of Hepatitis B and C.

Methodology

Methodology notes

We obtained and analyzed 2017 national multiple-cause mortality data from NVSS-M using CDC WONDER. Any death record with a report of hepatitis B (ICD-10: B16, B17.0, B18.0, and B18.1) listed as the underlying or a contributing cause of death in the record axis was included. Rates were standardized to the age distribution of the 2000 U.S. Standard Population (Klein 2001). FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories. Limitations: First, differences in recording practices of death certificate information may cause misclassification of ICD-10 codes and demographic information. Second, certain racial/ethnic populations likely are underrepresented in US Census data (the denominator for calculating rates) potentially causing overestimated rates for these populations. Third, HBV infections are often underreported as causes of death on death certificates. These analyses do not adjust for deaths resulting from undiagnosed viral hepatitis infections. Fourth, death records listing more than one type of viral hepatitis infection were counted once for each type of infection. For example, a death with ICD-10 codes for both hepatitis B and C virus infections is counted once as a hepatitis B death and once as a hepatitis C death. Note: Estimates for Healthy People 2030 viral hepatitis mortality objectives align with estimates obtained from CDC WONDER queries and may differ from estimates reported in annual Viral Hepatitis Surveillance reports due to inclusion of deaths that occurred in the US to noncitizens and differences in age adjustment categories used. The Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Summary methodology was developed to align with the methodology presented in the 2008 report The burden of digestive diseases in the United States (Everhart 2008) prepared for the NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

History

Revision History
Revised. 

In 2021, to align with the Viral Hepatitis National Strategic Plan (VH-NSP), the target-setting method was changed from "projection" to "maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies or laws." The target was revised from 0.23 deaths with hepatitis B as the underlying or contributing cause of death per 100,000 population to 0.16 deaths with hepatitis B as the underlying or contributing cause of death per 100,000 population.