Reduce the proportion of people who had opioid use disorder in the past year — SU‑18 Data Methodology and Measurement

About the National Data

Data

Baseline: 0.7 percent of persons aged 12 years and over reported an opioid use disorder (heroin or prescription pain reliever) in the past 12 months in 2018

Target: 0.5 percent

Numerator
Number of persons aged 12 years and over with opioid use disorder (defined as meeting DSM-IV criteria) in the past 12 months.
Denominator
Number of persons aged 12 years and over.
Target-setting method

Minimal statistical significance

Target-setting method details
Minimal statistical significance, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline.
Target-setting method justification
Trend data were evaluated for this objective, but it was not possible to project a target because the Healthy People 2030 Workgroup Subject Matter Experts expected a slowdown in progress. The standard error was used to calculate a target based on minimal statistical significance, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline. This method was used because it was a statistically significant improvement from the baseline.

Methodology

Methodology notes

The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) described two distinct disorders—opioid abuse and opioid dependence—with specific criteria for each. The fifth edition, DSM-5, integrates the two DSM-IV disorders into a single disorder called opioid use disorder, or OUD. Opioids include two categories of drugs: heroin and opioid prescription pain relievers. NSDUH collects dependence and abuse information for these two categories of drugs. A respondent was classified as having an opioid use disorder if he or she met DSM-IV criteria for heroin use disorder or pain reliever use disorder in the past 12 months.