March 24, 2017, 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. ET  |  Register Now

We’re pleased to invite you to join the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, PFCC partners, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for a webinar about health care-associated infections (HAIs).…

We’re excited to announce the launch of our brand-new Twitter handle: @HHSPrevention. Follow us!

Follow @HHSPrevention for information for health professionals on disease prevention and health promotion policies and programs. We’ll be sharing information about ODPHP events, including training opportunities, webinars, and conferences.

We’ll also keep you up to date on the latest health.gov announcements — such as updates about our work on the next edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines, new Dietary Guidelines tools and resources, health literacy information, and updated guidance on health care quality and patient safety.…

In December 2016, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) released a preliminary update to the National Scorecard on Rates of Hospital-Acquired Conditions showing a 21 percent reduction in hospital-acquired conditions – preventable complications during hospital visits – from the years 2010 to 2015. This update shows that nearly 125,000 fewer patients died, more than 3 million adverse events were avoided, and over $28 billion in health care costs were saved.…

A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that in 2013 and 2014, anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioid analgesics were among the most commonly implicated drug classes in emergency department visits for adverse drug events.

Christopher St. Clair, PharmD, ORISE Fellow and Clydette Powell, MD, MPH, FAAP, Director, Division of Health Care Quality, ODPHP

Every year, tens of thousands of patients die from infections they contract in hospitals — and at any given time, about 1 in 25 hospitalized patients have a health care-associated infection (HAI).…

Shared decision making is a patient-centered care communication strategy that encourages providers to inform patients about their options and then involve them in medical decisions — and it’s a key strategy for preventing hypoglycemic ADEs. That’s because applying a shared decision-making process to diabetes care results in individualized glycemic target setting — treatment is based on evidence-based guidelines and patients’ values and preferences.
On October 20, 2016, ODPHP announced proposed targets for the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan). The plan calls for coordination among federal and non-federal stakeholders to reduce adverse drug events that are considered to be common, clinically significant, preventable, and measurable. We invite interested public and private professionals, organizations, and consumer representatives to submit written comments by November 21, 2016.

By Don Wright, MD, MPH, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health; Director, ODPHP

Imagine a scenario in which your trusted family doctor told you that you need routine surgery. You might have been anxious or nervous at first, but you’ve had a chance to ask your doctor all your questions; you’ve planned for your recovery; and you are looking forward to living a healthier life afterward.…

By Ryan Moran, MD, Preventive Medicine Resident, University of California, San Diego

Although health care workers promote vaccinations to their patients, their own immunization rates lag behind the Healthy People 2020 target of 90%. This is a great concern, given that health care workers care for some of the most vulnerable populations in our society.…

Medications used to treat diabetes are among the most common causes of emergency hospitalizations due to adverse drug events. Diabetes agents are one of three medication classes that are the focus of the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention. The objectives of the action plan are to identify common, preventable, and measurable medication-induced harms and to align federal work to reduce adverse drug events nationally. The collective effort of all providers caring for patients with diabetes is essential in reaching national prevention goals for adverse drug events.