Be Active Your Way

The Be Active Your Way Blog is the official blog of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Follow the blog for updates about the development of the second edition of the Guidelines and insights from health and physical activity professionals about translating the Guidelines into practice.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Fortunately, it is largely preventable and there are many things people can do to reduce their risk, such as being more active. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health is encouraging Americans to move more and #MoveWithHeart to celebrate American Heart Month.
Welcome to the start of a New Year with new hopes, wishes, and strategies on the roadmap! Does your 2018 roadmap ensure that everyone is able to benefit from and enjoy your health promotion efforts? One in five adults in the United States have some type of disability, and approximately one in eight working-age adults have a disability. It’s everyone’s job to build inclusive workplaces and provide equal opportunities for worksite wellness. As you kick off your health promotions for the year, consider actively planning for and including employees with disabilities.
During the month of January, health and fitness is top of mind for people setting resolutions for a healthy new year. Google searches for fitness peak at the beginning of the year and the International Health, Racquet, and Sportsclub Association (IHRSA), reports that 10.8 percent of all health club members join their gyms in January. IHRSA offers health professionals five tips for how to help patients and clients stay motivated and be active year-round.
While the 'winter blues' may make it harder to stay active during winter, the great thing is that in nearly every community across the country there is a park and recreation agency that serves as a neighborhood resource, offering opportunities for community engagement as well as a variety of indoor activities and outdoor adventures  for all ages and abilities. The National Recreation and Park Association has some ideas on how to stay active this winter.
Until recently, early childhood specialists typically ignored the need for formal instruction focused on young children’s physical development. We now know that preschool children are at a critical stage of language and brain development, as well as physical development, and can greatly benefit from planned instruction aimed at achieving physical literacy. Most people are familiar with the term “literacy” as it relates to a child’s reading or writing skills. However, fewer adults are able to define the term “physical literacy,” which describes the proficiency in a wide variety of fundamental movement skills and concepts. In this post, SHAPE America discusses physical literacy in young children.
The Health Professions Mentorship Program (HPMP) is an exciting two-year curriculum out of the CUNY School of Medicine designed for rising high school juniors and seniors considering careers in healthcare. As part of the 2017 HPMP summer programming, the students were asked to provide insight into physical activity behaviors and preferences. In this post, we summarize the results of the students' research into adolescent physical activity preferences and describe a sample program that the HPMP students developed based on these results.
While the health, mental health, and social benefits of regular physical activity are well documented, individuals, families, and communities continue to find it difficult to get the recommended amount of physical activity. The need for physical activity turnkey programs, “how-to” resources, guides, and tools is critical for communities and CDPH is here to provide assistance.
The 2017 United States Report Card on Walking and Walkable Communities, released by the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance serves to establish a national baseline on walking behavior and identify opportunities for growth. The Report Card is the first comprehensive national assessment of walking and walkability in the United States. It measures the extent to which individuals and communities in the United States meet selected standards related to walking. Grades reflect national-level performance, not that of states or local municipalities. Initial grades indicate we’ve got some improvements to make!