Be Active Your Way

The Be Active Your Way Blog is the official blog of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Follow the blog for updates about the development of the second edition of the Guidelines and insights from health and physical activity professionals about translating the Guidelines into practice.

The Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee is composed of 17 nationally recognized experts in the fields of physical activity and health. These distinguished individuals agreed to serve on the Committee in a voluntary capacity to review current evidence and make recommendations that will help inform the next edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.…

By NCHPAD

In the spirit of the New Year, let’s reflect on physical activity and get back to basics regarding individuals with a disability. At the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), we believe that everyone can benefit from regular physical activity. Our mission is to encourage and support individuals with disabilities and chronic health conditions to become more physically active.…

Making New Year’s resolutions is easy, but like most things in life, consistent follow through is what may create results and sustain positive change. People of all ages and abilities benefit from physical activity. As a health care professional, you’re in a good position to encourage patients and clients, including those with physical disabilities, to get the New Year off to a healthy start.
On October 27-28, 2016 the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee held its second public meeting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD. It was the second of five planned public meetings. This second meeting provided an opportunity for the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee subcommittees to present their progress to the full Committee and gain consensus on several issues.

Today the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance released the 2016 United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

Ten key indicators were selected: (1) overall physical activity levels; (2) sedentary behaviors; (3) active transportation; (4) organized sport participation; (5) active play; (6) health-related fitness; (7) family and peers; (8) schools; (9) community and the built environment; and (10) government strategies and investments.…

Written on behalf of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases’ (NIDDK) Weight-control Information Network (WIN)

 

Diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans. Another 86 million people—more than 1 in 3 adults—have prediabetes.

For people with or at risk for diabetes, regular physical activity helps improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, has a positive effect on blood pressure and cholesterol, and helps manage weight.…

SHAPE America’s new position statement supporting schools’ use of the WSCC model outlines best practices for each of the 10 components and encourages health and physical educators to use the model to advocate for the alignment of health and education goals in an effort to meet the needs of all students.