On October 27-28, 2016 the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee held its second public meeting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD. It was the second of five planned public meetings. This second meeting provided an opportunity for the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee subcommittees to present their progress to the full Committee and gain consensus on several issues.
On November 16, 2016, we announced the appointment of 13 nationally recognized subject matter experts in health promotion, disease prevention, epidemiology, health literacy, communication, law, and state and local public health practice who will help us chart the course for Healthy People 2030.

Today the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance released the 2016 United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

Ten key indicators were selected: (1) overall physical activity levels; (2) sedentary behaviors; (3) active transportation; (4) organized sport participation; (5) active play; (6) health-related fitness; (7) family and peers; (8) schools; (9) community and the built environment; and (10) government strategies and investments.…

By Sharon Ricks, Regional Health Administrator, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Region IV

Sharon Ricks presenting award to Cheryl Emanuel in February 2016

This February, I traveled to Charlotte, North Carolina, to witness first-hand Mecklenburg County Health Department’s (MCHD) efforts to engage the faith community and other partners in its Village HeartBEAT (VHB) program.…

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy and the National Prevention Council Release Healthy Aging in Action: Advancing the National Prevention Strategy

Healthy Aging in Action (HAIA) identifies recommendations and actions to promote healthy aging and improve health and well-being in later life. HAIA highlights federal and nonfederal policies and programs that reflect the National Prevention Strategy’s approach of targeting prevention and wellness efforts to promote healthy aging to further advance the Strategy for an aging society.…

Written on behalf of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases’ (NIDDK) Weight-control Information Network (WIN)

 

Diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans. Another 86 million people—more than 1 in 3 adults—have prediabetes.

For people with or at risk for diabetes, regular physical activity helps improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, has a positive effect on blood pressure and cholesterol, and helps manage weight.…

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes like increasing physical activity, losing weight, and eating healthy.…

When we developed Health Literacy Online: A Guide for Simplifying the User Experience, we set out to help people create online health information and digital tools that are accessible and easy to understand for users with limited literacy skills. But the truth is that these principles and strategies don’t just benefit consumers with limited literacy skills, they benefit all online users — even health care professionals.
On October 20, 2016, ODPHP announced proposed targets for the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan). The plan calls for coordination among federal and non-federal stakeholders to reduce adverse drug events that are considered to be common, clinically significant, preventable, and measurable. We invite interested public and private professionals, organizations, and consumer representatives to submit written comments by November 21, 2016.

On October 19, Karen B. DeSalvo, MD, MPH, HHS assistant secretary for health,  unveiled Public Health 3.0, a new model for building healthier communities across America.

Read the report: Public Health 3.0: A Call to Action to Create a 21st Century Public Health Infrastructure – PDF

Public Health 3.0 recognizes that America has made great strides in recent years to expand access to medical care and preventive services, but that these successes have not guaranteed health equity for all.…