Written by the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance (NPAPA)

In the coming months, the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) will celebrate its 5th anniversary at the 2015 National Physical Activity Plan Congress. Since its launch, the NPAP has acted as a roadmap to policy makers and advocates to create a more physically active nation.…

By NPAP

The National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) will have reached success when the vast majority of Americans regularly meet or surpass the Physical Activity Guidelines. The NPAP has over 250 evidence-based recommendations for changes in the policies and systems that guide the environments in which we live, work, learn, play, and commute.…

By ICAA

What do we know about physical activity among older adults?

For starters, physical activity is a powerful means to help prevent age-related loss of function, reduce the risk of chronic disease, improve mental and physical health, and support quality of life.

Older adults who exercise can:

Reduce their risk of heart disease, some cancers, hypertension, high cholesterol and obesity; Mediate hypertension, diabetes and depression; Lower their risk of falls and injury; And improve their sleep.…

By NPAP

How do you measure something as far reaching as a national plan to get an entire population to be more physically active? Is the answer as simple as measuring physical activity across representative samples of the population to document how many Americans are or are not meeting federal Physical Activity Guidelines?…

By NPAP

In all likelihood, if you are reading this blog, you’re already well aware of the myriad of benefits associated with being regularly physically active, and you likely meet or exceed federal physical activity guidelines. What you may be less aware of are the ways in which you can become a voice for physical activity promotion in your community, so that your neighbors, colleagues, and friends can also realize the benefits of being more active.…

By NPAP

“One day, all Americans will be physically active and then will live, work, and play in environments that facilitate regular physical activity.”  This is the stated vision of the US National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP), and it speaks to the importance of targeting specific settings.  Success of the NPAP will come, in large part, as the result of local actions that target specific settings such as schools, workplaces, community streets, and parks. …

By NPAP

As was written in NCPPA’s recent blog, public policy is a complex process, involving participation from individuals and organizations working to influence those in position to make policy change.  Evident in the NPAP’s guiding principles (see below), the NPAP is a policy document at heart.  If acted upon, the policy changes called for in the NPAP will create environments that weave physical activity back into the fabric of American’s daily lives. …

By NPAP

I’m very pleased to announce the first National Physical Activity Plan for the United States.  The launch on May 3rd represents the culmination of a two-year effort to develop the Plan and the beginning of the long-term effort to implement it.

Through implementation, government, private industry, non-profits, communities and individuals can now work together under a common set of strategies aimed at one thing; getting more Americans to be more physically active. …

By NPAP

The launch of the National Physical Activity Plan is set for May 3, 2010.  This date will represent the culmination of a two year long effort to produce the first U.S. National PA Plan.  The goal is to kick off a long-term social movement to have more Americans meet federal PA Guidelines. …

By NPAP

As important as the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are, we know that simply telling people what they should do will not necessarily enable them to act.  So, in 2007 I was excited when colleagues at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encouraged me to coordinate the process of developing a National Physical Activity Plan for the U.S. …