Written by Alexandra Black MPH, RD, LDN, Health Promotion Manager, IHRSA 

The title question was addressed during IHRSA’s first twitter chat last week. During the chat, we discussed some of the barriers that keep people from making exercise a regular habit, some of the things society is doing right –and wrong – to help create a more active culture, and how health clubs specifically could help make their communities more active.…

Posted by IHRSA

The 80/20 rule has become a shorthand way of describing a system where 80% of the output is created by 20% of the inputs/participants. It’s a phenomenon witnessed by economists and social scientists across several sectors of society. In business, for example, 80% of a company’s negative feedback may come from just 20% of its customers; 80% of sales may come from 20% of the sales staff; and on volunteer boards of directors, 80% of the work may come from 20% of the volunteers.…

By IHRSA

We’ve written previously about the importance of making the healthy choice, not only the easy choice, but also the happy choice. This approach emphasizes the role that supportive environments can play in inducing healthy behaviors. We’ve also addressed the impact of social circles and support networks.…

By IHRSA

In a recent post, we discussed the importance of making the healthy choice, not just the “easy choice,” but also the happy choice. This week, we’ll touch on the power of making the healthy place, the easy and happy place.

It’s fair to say that a neighborhood fitness center serves a very different purpose than a neighborhood tavern. …

By IHRSA

In March 2013, IHRSA awarded Radka Dopitova Willson with the “Julie Main Woman Leader Scholarship” for her work to develop the Back To Life program for cancer patients and survivors.

At the award ceremony, Radka had a wonderful message for the fitness community:

I would like to challenge all of you in our health and fitness industry to offer a helping hand to cancer survivors.

By IHRSA

Our nation’s determined band of wellness revolutionaries has rallied around a wonderfully succinct and effective policy slogan: Make the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice.

 

In the context of promoting physical activity, the “easy choice” varies depending on the environment. At the workplace, for example, the “easy choice” might mean taking an authorized exercise break during the day, using a treadmill desk, or conducting walking meetings.…

By IHRSA

As a trade association for fitness centers, IHRSA is responsible for creating and fostering an industry marketplace for creative programming. A particularly robust segment of that marketplace relates to youth programming in health clubs. Ideas are swirling about engagement, program design, and how to collaborate with communities to fill gaps left by budget cuts to recess and physical education.…

By IHRSA

One of the nation’s greatest public health policy successes of the past ten years may be the widespread implementation of corporate wellness policies.

In fact, a recent notice from the Federal government states, “The Departments believe that appropriately designed wellness programs have the potential to contribute importantly to promoting health and preventing disease.” In this case, “the Departments” refer to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the US Department of Labor, and the US Department of the Treasury.…

By IHRSA

A thrilling new initiative of the National Indian Health Board (NIHB), “GO the EXTRA MILE with NIHB” greatly expands the reach of the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP).

NIHB Executive Director, Stacey Bohlen, described GO the EXTRA MILE in a recent letter to tribal representatives.

“The GO the EXTRA MILE initiative is a result of the NIHB signing the CEO pledge, which is part of a national campaign to encourage Executive Directors to commit to supporting and fostering a physically-active workplace.

By IHRSA

This past month, the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN) unveiled its new Presidential Youth Fitness Program. At first blush, it may seem like simply an update of the youth test familiar to generations of Americans. But that impression would represent a profound misunderstanding of the intent and content of the new test.…