There are around 4 million births per year in the United States. Several hundred thousand of these infants are admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) annually because of a national prematurity rate of 9.6%, as well as 2-3% rate of congenital anomalies.  

Each month, we release an infographic with the latest data related to a Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicator (LHI) topic. These infographics show progress toward Healthy People 2020 LHI targets — and show where there’s still work to be done.  

This month’s featured LHI topic is Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity.…

The 2017 United States Report Card on Walking and Walkable Communities, released by the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance serves to establish a national baseline on walking behavior and identify opportunities for growth. The Report Card is the first comprehensive national assessment of walking and walkability in the United States. It measures the extent to which individuals and communities in the United States meet selected standards related to walking. Grades reflect national-level performance, not that of states or local municipalities. Initial grades indicate we’ve got some improvements to make!
November 16, 2017 | 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. ET | Register Now 

Good nutrition, physical activity, and a healthy body weight are essential parts of a person’s overall health and well-being. Together, these can help decrease a person’s risk of developing serious health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cancer.…

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes like getting more physical activity, losing weight, and eating healthy.…

In recognition of National Health Literacy Month, we’re highlighting a resource for health care providers that uses strategies for improving health literacy to promote safe use of medication in order to prevent adverse drug events (ADEs). Health literacy is the degree to which a person has the capacity to obtain, communicate, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. A person’s health literacy influences the way they access and use health information and services.