While the 'winter blues' may make it harder to stay active during winter, the great thing is that in nearly every community across the country there is a park and recreation agency that serves as a neighborhood resource, offering opportunities for community engagement as well as a variety of indoor activities and outdoor adventures  for all ages and abilities. The National Recreation and Park Association has some ideas on how to stay active this winter.

From Healthy People 2020 Stories from the Field, a series highlighting communities across the Nation that are addressing the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs).

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all adults ages 50 to 75 get screened for the disease.…

ODPHP and the Federal Steering Committee for the Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections (HAIs) have written a new phase of the National Action Plan to Prevent Health Care-Associated Infections: Road Map to Elimination (HAI Action Plan). The first 3 phases of the HAI Action Plan meaningfully enhanced coordination of federal efforts to address HAIs by establishing a structure to regularly share best practices, resources, and lessons learned among federal partners.…

Each month, we release an infographic with the latest data related to a Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicator (LHI) topic. These infographics show progress toward Healthy People 2020 LHI targets — and show where there’s still work to be done.

This month’s featured LHI topic is Clinical Preventive Services. Check out the infographic below, then head over to the Healthy People 2020 LHI Infographic Gallery to see infographics for other LHI topic areas.…

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but regular screening can save lives by finding polyps (precancerous growths) before they become cancer. The USPSTF recommends screening everyone ages 50 to 75 for colorectal cancer.

Since there are different types of colorectal cancer screening tests, it’s important for clinicians to use shared decision making with patients when talking about these life-saving preventive services.…

Until recently, early childhood specialists typically ignored the need for formal instruction focused on young children’s physical development. We now know that preschool children are at a critical stage of language and brain development, as well as physical development, and can greatly benefit from planned instruction aimed at achieving physical literacy. Most people are familiar with the term “literacy” as it relates to a child’s reading or writing skills. However, fewer adults are able to define the term “physical literacy,” which describes the proficiency in a wide variety of fundamental movement skills and concepts. In this post, SHAPE America discusses physical literacy in young children.
The Health Professions Mentorship Program (HPMP) is an exciting two-year curriculum out of the CUNY School of Medicine designed for rising high school juniors and seniors considering careers in healthcare. As part of the 2017 HPMP summer programming, the students were asked to provide insight into physical activity behaviors and preferences. In this post, we summarize the results of the students' research into adolescent physical activity preferences and describe a sample program that the HPMP students developed based on these results.