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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Nutrition and Your Health:
Dietary Guidelines for Americans

U.S. Department of Agriculture

PART E: TRANSLATING THE SCIENCE INTO DIETARY GUIDANCE

Table E-26. Tips for Those at High Risk of Foodborne Illness

Who is at high risk of foodborne illness?

What foods are high risk and support the growth of Listeria monocytogenes?

Tips for Those at High Risk of Foodborne Illness

Who is at high risk of foodborne illness?

  • Pregnant women and their fetuses
  • Young children
  • Older persons
  • People with weakened immune systems or certain chronic illnesses
  • Individuals with pre-existing illness

Which foods are associated with listeriosis and pose a high risk to certain high-risk and sensitive individuals?

  • Some deli meats (excluding those that are very salty, such as some ham, or low in water activity, such as salami) and frankfurters that have not been reheated to steaming hot. Some ready-to-eat foods.

Besides following the guidance in this guideline, some of the extra precautions those at high risk should take are—

  • Do not eat or drink unpasteurized juices, raw sprouts, raw (unpasteurized) milk, and products (such as cheese) made from unpasteurized milk.
  • Do not eat raw or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and shellfish (clams, oysters, scallops, and mussels).
New information on food safety is constantly emerging. Recommendations and precautions for people at high risk are updated as scientists learn more about preventing foodborne illness. If you are among those at high risk, you need to be aware of and follow the most current information on food safety.

For the latest information and precautions, call USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555, or FDA’s Food Information Line, 1-888-SAFE FOOD, or consult your healthcare provider. You can also get up-to-date information by checking the Government’s food safety Web site at http://www.foodsafety.gov.

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Table of Contents

A. Executive Summary

B. Introduction

C. Methodology

D. Science Base
  •  
  • Section 1. Aiming To Meet Nutrient Intake Recommendations
     
  •  
  • Text
     
  •  
  • Tables
  •  
  • Section 2. Energy
  •  
  • Section 3. Discretionary Calories
  •  
  • Section 4. Fats
  •  
  • Section 5. Carbohydrates
  •  
  • Section 6. Selected Food Groups
  •  
  • Section 7. Fluid and Electrolytes
  •  
  • Section 8. Ethanol
  •  
  • Section 9. Food Safety
  •  
  • Section 10. Major Conclusions

    E.  Translating the Science into Dietary Guidance
        
  • Text
  •  
  • Tables and Figures
  • F.  Research Recommendations

    G. Appendices
  •  
  • Glossary
  •  
  • Description of USDA Analyses
  •  
  • Summary Tables from Systematic Review
  •  
  • IOM Tables
    (Institute of Medicine tables referenced in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report are available at http://www.nap.edu)
  •  
  • History of Dietary Guidelines
  •  
  • Summary of Recommendations
  •  
  • Biographical Sketches of DGAC Members
  •  
  • Acknowledgements

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