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Physical Activity Guidelines

Appendix 3. Federal Web Sites That Promote Physical Activity

Individuals and Families

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Falls/index.html

Preventing Falls in Older Adults promotes physical activity as part of the approach to reducing falls and fall-related injuries among older adults.

National Institutes of Health
http://nihseniorhealth.gov/exerciseforolderadults/healthbenefits/01.html

NIH Senior Health provides aging-related health information for seniors on a variety of topics, including exercise and the causes and prevention of balance problems and falls. Exercise and Physical Activity: Your Everyday Guide from the National Institute on Aging, an evidence-based guide that provides information about how older adults can meet the Physical Activity Guidelines can be found at http://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/exercise-physical-activity/introduction.

Office of the Surgeon General
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/initiatives/walking/index.html

The Office of the Surgeon General promotes Every Body Walk!, an initiative to promote walking and walkable communities. The Web site provides resources for how to promote walking as an effective strategy to increase active living.

President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
http://www.presidentschallenge.org

The President’s Challenge program recognizes adults and children for meeting physical activity goals through its Presidential Active Lifestyle Award and Presidential Champions program. In addition, the program continues its longstanding physical fitness testing program for children and adolescents. An adult fitness test, found at http://www.adultfitnesstest.org, allows adults aged 18 and older to track their current level of fitness. Additional information can be found at the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports http://www.fitness.gov.

Schools

Division of Adolescent and School Health, CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/npao/index.htm

The Nutrition, Physical Activity, & Obesity section of the CDC’s Adolescent and School Health Web site provides evidence-based guidance for schools on how to implement policies and practices that effectively promote healthy choices and behaviors among youth.

Communities

Administration on Aging (AoA)
http://www.aoa.gov
Search: physical activity

The AoA Evidence-Based Disease Prevention Program provides examples of how community-based organizations deliver low-cost evidence-based physical activity programs that benefit older adults and help them to thrive in their communities.

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO), CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/index.html

CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) is working to implement policy and environmental strategies to make healthy eating and active living accessible and affordable for everyone.

Federal Highway Administration
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/bicycle_pedestrian/index.cfm

The Bicycle and Pedestrian program provides resources to help promote bicycle and pedestrian transportation use, safety, and accessibility. Resources include a listing of State Pedestrian and Bicycle Coordinators and information on funding sources and legislation. This Web site also links to the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center, which provides information on engineering, advocacy, education, and enforcement topics.

Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.epa.gov/aging/bhc/index.htm

The Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging program provides tools to support community efforts to employ smart growth and active aging policies and programs. One focus of the program is the Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging awards program, which recognizes communities for advancing smart growth and active aging measures.

National Institutes of Health
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan

We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition) is an educational program for families and communities focused on helping youths improve food choices, increase physical activity, and reduce screen time. We Can! is jointly sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development; and the National Cancer Institute.

National Park Service
http://www.nps.gov/ncrc/programs/rtca/helpfultools/ht_publications.html

The Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program has helpful tools that provide resources and information on trail and greenways programs and trail development. For example, the site has a toolbox of materials on how to turn a community dream of building a trail or revitalizing a park or open space into reality.

Health Care

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/

The Agency for Health-care Research & Quality supports this independent panel of experts in primary care and prevention that systematically reviews the evidence of effectiveness and develops recommendations for clinical preventive services. The USPSTF recognizes that regular physical activity helps prevent chronic disease and decrease morbidity. The USPSTF counseling recommendation about promoting physical activity is focused on behavioral counseling services delivered in primary care practices.

Worksites

Healthier Worksite Initiative, CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/hwi/index.htm

This CDC initiative provides health promotion program planners working in State and Federal Government offices with information on a variety of health promotion programs, including physical activity promotion and fitness center design and management. The Web site also links to resources from other nonprofit and educational organizations through the Quick Resources section.

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