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Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015

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Comments submitted to the federal government on the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

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Anonymous Comment ID #3537

03/04/2015

I REJECT THE PRESUMPTION BY A SMALL GROUP OF SELF PROCLAIMED "EXPERTS" WHO CLAIM THE KNOWLEDGE OR RIGHT TO IMPOSE THEIR OPINIONS REGARDING WHAT I CAN OR CANNOT EAT IN CONTRAVENTION OF THE COLLECTIVE ACTION AND DECISIONS OF OVER 330,000,000 CITITZENS. OR SHOULD WE JUST LET THE MAJORITY DECIDE? HOW DO YOU THINK THAT WOULD END? PRO TWINKIE OR ANTI TWINKIE? LETS FIND OUT!

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • General Comment/Other

Jessica Jauregui Comment ID #3536

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #3535

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration

Affiliation: Other Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #3534

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Summer Marasco Comment ID #3533

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Mrs.
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Erin Bergquist MPH,RD Comment ID #3532

03/04/2015

Thank you for addressing sustainability in the Dietary Guidelines! I am a Registered Dietitian and I firmly believe we must be able to provide a safe, nutritious, culturally appropriate and environmentally responsible diet advice to Americans. Thank you!

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #3530

03/04/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets
to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure,
and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger
wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines
for Americans. However, the report reversed decades of warnings against
cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science.
Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to
cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the
report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013
report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology
and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found
Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to
develop type 2 diabetes‹which leads to cardiovascular disease. I ask that
the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol‹found only in meat
and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease,
diabetes, and cancer. The final guidelines should also remove wording
recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs,
and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones"
or protect against fractures. Even with these flaws, the new Dietary
Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Book Publishing Co
Topic:
  • General Comment/Other

Katera Neil Comment ID #3531

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Carrlee Pinder Comment ID #3529

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety

Barbara Mathison CHC Comment ID #3528

03/04/2015

Dear Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell,

As a citizen and a taxpayer concerned about the sustainability of our health and our planet, I applaud the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for including the major findings represented in Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety regarding plant-based diets as more health promoting and associated with less environmental impact than the current U.S. diet.

In late 2014, the international affairs think-tank Chatham House released a study which concluded that it is unlikely global temperature rises can be kept below two degrees Celsius without a radical shift in global meat and dairy consumption. However, they found that there is a striking lack of efforts to reduce consumption of meat and dairy products due to not least, government’s fear of backlash to pursue policies that would shift consumer behavior. The absence of attention afforded to the issue among policy-makers contributes to a lack of research on how best to reduce meat and dairy consumption, which the health of our nation and our planet can no longer afford.

The data presented in the Chatham House study also revealed a major awareness gap about the livestock industry’s contribution to the climate change. They found that compared with other sectors, the public’s recognition of the livestock sector as a significant contributor to a warming planet was markedly low. They noted that consumers with a higher level of awareness were “more likely to indicate willingness to reduce their meat and dairy consumption for climate objectives.” Closing the awareness gap is therefore likely to be an important precondition for behavior change.

Americans and programs across the United States rely on the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) recommendations for proper guidance when making food choices. These guidelines are the first step towards a more empowered and healthy, nation and planet.

In addition to embracing the DGAC recommendations, I respectfully request that the following provisions be heavily considered when finalizing the report:

· While the DGAC cites the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) for identifying the Mediterranean diet as an example of a sustainable diet, their own findings have shown that most of the world's fisheries have reached their maximum potential for capture, with the majority of stocks being fully exploited. In addition, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) states that fish consumption advisories for methylmercury now account for more than three-quarters of all fish consumption advisories in the United States.

· Massive amounts of critical irrigated surface and ground water are used in the production of meat and dairy, which diverts scarce water resources and accelerates the rapid depletion of underground aquifers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1,000 gallons of water are required to produce just one gallon of milk. Nut and soy based milks have been found to be much less-water intensive than dairy based products, more health promoting and should be advertised as a main form of calcium in combination with plants.

In 2014, Cone Communications Food Issues Trend Tracker revealed Americans are willing to sacrifice variety and dollars in order to eat more consciously. Although family satisfaction is the primary driver (97%), health and nutrition (93%) and sustainability (77%) were shown to be major important factors when deciding which foods to buy.

It is now up to the USDA to embrace the DGAC recommendations that will help consumers to understand that long-term individual health and food system sustainability are synonymous.

In closing, I urge you to include the DGAC recommendations for incorporating environmental sustainability into the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Thank you for your consideration.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Nutritious Way
Topic:
  • Chapter D.5: Food Sustainability and Safety
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