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Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015

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Ali Chughtai Dr. Comment ID #730

09/16/2014

Moderate physical activity in hot sub-tropical weather entails that fruit intake be three servings per day.

Affiliation: Public Health Department Organization: Lahore Cantt. Board.
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #729

09/15/2014

I feel like restaurants should enforce management to do and give trainings to the seriousness of food safety. I was not aware of a lot until actually taught. I feel if workers are aware they will be less food poisoning cases.. I being someone who gets it a lot.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Community College of Philadelphia
Topic:
  • Food Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #728

09/15/2014

Three things I would like to see emphasized in the 2015 DGA.

1. Stronger guidance needed around reduced consumption of animal products.
2. Encourage more sustainable protein sources like beans/legumes. And when animal proteins are consumed, the animals are raised in humane environments.
3. Reduced food waste. Strategies to prevent food waste at home.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Sustainability

Kari Ryan Ph.D., R.D Comment ID #727

09/15/2014

Affiliation: Industry/Industry Association Organization: Kraft Foods Group, Inc.
Topic:
  • Energy Balance (Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, Calorie Intake, Physical Activity)
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #726

09/15/2014

As a Certified Diabetes Educator I am often called upon to lead discussions about diabetes prevention and/or management. I offer refer to the USDA 2010 new website www.chooseMyplate.gov. However, my awareness has recently been expanded about the terminology used on the website, which is not clear in all areas. For example, in the foods to increase section it is VERY clear to increase fruits and vegetables. In the section of foods to decrease, unfortunately, it is not as clear to say eat less fat. Whenever I am teaching in this area I always have to go into the explanation of saturated fat coming from animals versus some plant oils are just fine to have as a part of your healthy diet. I suggest it could to say "eat less meat"; a VERY clear statement that does not need explanation.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Kari Hecker Ryan PhD, RD Comment ID #725

09/15/2014

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans provide the basis for Federal food and nutrition policy and education for how Americans can consume a diet to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, promote health, and prevent disease. The USDA’s Nutrition Evidence Library (NEL) review along with a diet modeling analysis resulted in the 2010 recommendation for Americans to “focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods and beverages…vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, and nuts and seeds.” During the 4th meeting of Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) 2015, Subcommittee 1 reported that “mixed dishes,” especially burgers and sandwiches, contribute substantially to saturated fat and sodium intakes. We endorse a separation between sandwiches prepared at home and burgers and tacos to clarify dietary pattern analysis results.

This comment is submitted to demonstrate that sandwiches can align with dietary recommendations especially when Americans are provided with nutrition education about making smart choices in food selection and portion control. We encourage the DGAC to recognize the role sandwiches serve in contemporary lifestyles as convenient and portable mealtime solutions comprised of a combination of MyPlate food group servings and to align recommendations with science-based evidence. We request the DGAC to encourage the American population to select sandwiches made with nutrient-dense ingredients such as whole grain breads, vegetables, calcium and vitamin D rich cheese, and lean sources of meat/protein.

Overall, there is a lack of clarity in the broad definition of “sandwich.” Consequently, sandwiches are categorized with “mixed dishes” ranging from burgers, tacos, pizzas, and soups despite differences in ingredient and nutrient composition. In keeping with the approach that all foods can fit and there is no single recommended eating pattern, we encourage the DGAC to acknowledge the practical role and nutrient-density that sandwiches contribute to dietary intakes – particularly when made with recommended ingredients – and not to single out sandwiches as a source of overconsumption to limit or avoid. Scientific findings do not demonstrate an association between sandwich intake and obesity or type two diabetes3–5. Sandwiches prepared with bread, lean sources of protein, cheese, and vegetables can qualify as a “main dish,” rather than an “individual food/mixed dish” in meal planning and can contribute towards recommended foods groups and nutrients. We urge the DGAC to focus on guidance about food choices that can be applied to nutrition education, meal planning, and nutritionally sound sandwich preparation.

Affiliation: Industry/Industry Association Organization: Kraft Foods Group, Inc.
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)

Amber Garlan Comment ID #724

09/15/2014

I would like to see health non GMO fruits and vegtables given priority. Non GMO fruits and vegetables grown locally by small family farmers.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Food Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #723

09/15/2014

According to the Center for Disease Control, allergies are up 50 percent since 2009, the time when GMOs became widespread. My children all have allergies, despite no family history. It doesn't matter if we're eating the right food groups in the right proportions if we're all ignorantly eating food that's banned in other parts of the world because it's unsafe to eat and toxic for the land. The FDA's original policy on GMOs, written by an attorney who had represented Monsanto, was a perfect case of regulatory capture. Some agency at the federal level has to watch out for what's actually in the interests of our health and safety. Just about everything is wrong with our industrial food system--except volume--we're good on volume. But GMOs are one thing that the federal government can and must address to ensure a baseline of real, whole foods. I am able to largely opt of of GMOs by buying organic--the right thing to do is to support the only food system that supports health and the ecology. But most people don't have that privilege. Right now, farm subsidies reward GMO growers and a corrupt regulatory system rewards the chemical companies that profit from this technology. None of us should be eating GMOs--independent science is making that increasingly clear. The focus on calories and just the right balance between vegetables and grains is rearranging deck chairs on a sinking ship. We need healthy, real, non-toxic food. Everyone. All of us. It's possible--the federal government can make it happen. Set the influence of industry aside and imagine that we could actually be supporting people's health in this country.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Food Safety

Joanna Mackenzie RD Comment ID #722

09/15/2014

See attached

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Sustainability

Anonymous Comment ID #721

09/14/2014

I also agree that nutrition and affordability should be a focus. Many children may only get one or two proper meals a day, and they receive them at school. At home, families may not have the resources to provide nutrient dense foods for their families. School lunches, family cooking classes taught at school, clear and concise information on what is the best option between canned/frozen vegetables and other healthful options are important topics.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Student at Community College of Philadelphia
Topic:
  • Behavior
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